Medical student first responder schemes: mixed methods study (MSFR)

PROJECT TITLE MEDICAL STUDENT FIRST RESPONDER SCHEMES: MIXED METHODS STUDY (MSFR)
Funding body University of Lincoln School of Health and Social Care small grant
Total funding £300
Team
  • Prof Niro Siriwardena CaHRU, University of Lincoln
  • Dr Nimali Wijegoonewardena, International Visiting Fellow, CaHRU, UoL and PGIM University of Colombo
  • Dr Andrew Orsi, F2 doctor, Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust
  • Adam Watson, medical student and Community First Responder, Oxford University
  • Dylan Lloyd, University of Buckingham Medical School, Milton Keynes
  • Dr Julie Pattinson, CaHRU, University of Lincoln
  • Dr Vanessa Botan, CaHRU, University of Lincoln
  • Dr Zahid Asghar, CaHRU, UoL
  • Nicola Dunbar, South Central Ambulance Service NHS Trust
Team/consortium
  • University of Lincoln
  • University of Oxford
  • University of Nottingham and Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust
  • University of Buckingham Medical School, Milton Keynes
  • East Midlands Ambulance Service NHS Trust
  • South Central Ambulance Service NHS Trust
Overarching aim The overarching aim is to investigate the contribution of medical student first responder schemes to the experiences and perceptions of medical students.
Objectives The objectives of this study are to:

  1. Investigate activities of MSFRs
  2. To explore perceptions of MSFR including reasons of joining the MSFR scheme, training received, experiences of being a MSFR, positive and negative experiences, and effects of experience on learning outcomes and future career prospects
Methods Mixed methods: database (cross-sectional) study, qualitative interviews, and data integration
Outcomes The study will describe the activities and impact of medical student first responder schemes.
Outputs We will disseminate via conference presentations, peer reviewed publications and through reports to medical schools and ambulance services.
Impact The study will help inform current and future medical student first responder schemes and will also link with our current NIHR study on community first responder (CFR) schemes in the UK.